answered 2 weeks ago on 6 July 2014  

hey that last post was made up dennys didnt post that but honestly i totally believed it, i just found out bc i clicked on the link to check out dennys tumbr to see more of their posts



what the heck tumblr

dennys:

nonstaff:

What’s up with the denny’s tumblr? Does a national restaurant chain really need to post such stupid stuff?

I came out to have a good time and I’m honestly feeling so attacked right now

reblogged 3 weeks ago on 2 July 2014 WITH 58,991 notes »reblog
via rioloser // originally aparadoxinflux
Title: just press play

436,024 plays

norvern:

aparadoxinflux:

I’m so done please read the article first and stop

oh

oH

reblogged 3 weeks ago on 2 July 2014 WITH 58,991 notes »reblog
via lozchic3 // originally aparadoxinflux
Title: just press play

436,024 plays

reblogged 3 weeks ago on 2 July 2014 WITH 99,487 notes »reblog
via pousseygame // originally beyondstyx

For lonely people, rain is a chance to be touched.

Simon Van Booy (via a0mame)  
reblogged 3 weeks ago on 27 June 2014 WITH 43,112 notes »reblog
via stitchomancy // originally krumcake

krumcake:

Honestly, I’m really only interested in soulmate AUs with alternative plots.

I don’t really care about person A and person B who have each other’s names on their wrists and find each other and live happily ever after. I care about a culture where people don’t bother forming romantic relationships with anyone other than their soulmate, where they finally find their soulmate and realize they don’t know how to handle the ups and downs of a relationship.

I care about people who fall in love with someone who isn’t their soulmate and aren’t willing to leave.

I care about queer people who are outed by the names on their arms, about trans people who spend their whole lives worrying that their birth name will be on their soulmate’s arm, then sobbing in relief when it’s not.

I care about people in poly relationships and how that looks.

I care about asexual aromantic people who have a name anyway and wonder if they’re broken or if it’s the platonic soulmate they’ve always wanted.

I care about people who Google their soulmate and are disappointed by what they find. I care about the private detective agencies that rake in cash to help people find their soulmates. I care about the ways non-soulmate couples are discriminated against, from disapproving grandmas to insurance companies that won’t insure someone’s spouse unless they’re their soulmate. I care about teenagers who are devastated that their celebrity crush isn’t their soulmate and what happens when the media discovers a young, unknown person whose soulmate is hugely famous.

I care about the people who never meet their soulmates, whose soulmates died young, whose soulmates have another name on their arms.

I care about the ways that this is a broken system, how it fucks people up, how it doesn’t guarantee a happy ending and how people find their happy endings anyway.

reblogged 3 weeks ago on 27 June 2014 WITH 946 notes »reblog
via bolto // originally brngrmln

brngrmln:

what if aliens invaded and were really uncomfortable with how many furries and monsterfuckers wanted to willingly be their sex slaves so they left, and then furries ended up saving the world, dude

this sounds like a mass effect fanfic i read once

reblogged 3 weeks ago on 27 June 2014 WITH 10,101 notes »reblog
via whatlander // originally ethiopienne

These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

reblogged 4 weeks ago on 25 June 2014 WITH 18,436 notes »reblog
via ziroen // originally gaypee

gaypee:

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i think that’s everything

everydaycomics:

Best slumber party eva~!